Peoplesafe Personal Safety Champion Announced!

Bovis

Richard Jones of Bovis Homes has been named as the Personal Safety Champion at the National Personal Safety Awards.

The Personal Safety Champion award was for the individual who best facilitated the improvement of safety for employees in the workplace.

Richard, who is Bovis Homes Group Customer and Sales Service director, was presented with the award at the Suzy Lamplugh Trust National Personal Safety Awards in London.

Peoplesafe sponsored the awards, which were hosted by former Crimewatch presenter Jacqui Hames.

The Personal Safety Champion award was for the individual who best facilitated the improvement of safety for employees in the workplace, especially for those employees who work alone. Other nominees for the award were Rob Harris of Fry Housing and Paul Forsythe of Severnside Housing.

There were eight other categories including Safer Community, Safer Workplace, Campus Safety, Young Person’s Safety and Best Safety Campaign. Among the other winners were Manchester Mind, Voice 4 Victims and the Andrew Page Group.

Peoplesafe’s managing director, Ian Johannessen, said:

“The standard of entries was very high, which was fantastic to see, as it shows that people do take personal safety very seriously.

“The work undertaken by people like Richard at Bovis demonstrates that personal safety for lone workers can’t just be a box-ticking exercise. It’s not just a case of giving staff equipment, somebody needs to champion the cause and really care about lone worker safety.”

Richard said: “Looking after the safety of staff is important for every organisation. At Bovis Homes we want to make sure that our staff actually use the devices as part of their everyday working.

Lone worker safety has to be part of the culture of an organisation to make sure it actually happens on the ground. We go out of our way to train our frontline staff, but we also report back on lone worker safety at board level.”

The Suzy Lamplugh Trust works to reduce the risk of violence and aggression through campaigning, education and support.

The charity was set up by Paul and Diana Lamplugh in memory of their daughter Suzy, a 25-year-old estate agent, who disappeared in 1986 after she went to meet an unknown client in London. Her body was never found.